CIRCLE (The Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement)
conducts research on the civic and political engagement of young Americans.
The Center for Information & Research on Civic Learning and Engagement

CIRCLE Launches Online Seminar to Discuss Youth Engagement Report

To enhance and broaden the discussions around the report of our Commission on Youth Voting and Civic Knowledge, we have developed a FREE, five-week, open online seminar that will extend research and recommendations from the report.

December 6th, 2013
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Crucial Role for Higher Ed in Building Youth Civic Engagement

There are deep inequalities in youth civic knowledge and participation across socioeconomic levels that must be addressed to strengthen our democracy, and there is a vital role for universities and other institutions of higher education, not only in promoting youth engagement, but also closing this gap.

November 18th, 2013
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So, What Next? Recommendations for Working with Young People in Communities

Yesterday, CIRCLE released a new major study on the civic engagement of young people who are not in school or college. CIRCLE has compiled recommendations, informed by our conversations with some of these young people. The following is a summary of these recommendations (which can also be found in the report): Schools can: Provide civic Read More >

August 24th, 2012
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Youth Unemployment and Civic Engagement

It’s hard to ignore the rhetoric in newspapers these days about youth, especially the wealth of articles about college graduations and the economy grads are entering into.  As the economy gets better, more and more youth are being described as “freeloaders,” narcissistic,” and “slackers.” I don’t think that’s a fair assessment of who youth are. Read More >

June 2nd, 2011
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Why Young People Don’t Vote

This graph (using Census survey data from 2010) presents an interesting contrast: College students are much more likely to cite being out of town or away from home as the reason they didn’t vote. That make sense: they tend to live away. Their peers who are not in college are somewhat more likely to cite Read More >

Categories: CIRCLE Blog
May 13th, 2011
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Find more analysis in our 2016 Election Center. For regular updates in your Inbox about youth and the 2016 election, sign up for CIRCLE's monthly E-Update here.